Home / Archive / 2/2020 / How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the “Insane”? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900–1933
Document Actions

Citation and metadata

Recommended citation

Anna Urbach: How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the “Insane”? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900–1933. In: European Journal for Nursing History and Ethics 2 (2020). DOI: 10.25974/enhe2020-6en

Download Citation

Endnote

%0 Journal Article
%T How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the “Insane”? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900–1933
%A Urbach, Anna
%J European Journal for Nursing History and Ethics
%D 2020
%V 2
%N 1
%F urbach2020
%X This article sheds light on nurses’ early ventures into union work, it analyses the conditions, circumstances and boundaries the unionisation of psychiatric nurses entailed during the German Reich in the early 20th century. I use the staff files of selected nurses and orderlies from the former Uchtspringe Prussian State Asy-lum to reconstruct case histories of unionised nursing staff. We can say that until the ban on organising was lifted in 1918, the nurses of the “insane” were strictly forbidden to act independently of the institution’s man-agement within a trade union. Nonetheless, there is evidence that a number of nurses and orderlies of Uchtspringe were members of the German Association of Nurses and Orderlies (Deutscher Verband der Krankenpfleger und Krankenpflegerinnen) even before the beginning of the First World War. In 1919, a branch of the Association of Municipal and State Workers (Verband der Gemeinde- und Staatsarbeiter, VGS), which had close ties to the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), was founded at Uchtspringe, and dur-ing the Weimar period it became the main union representative of Uchtspringe’s committed staff. When the National Socialists seized power, they abruptly ended the activity of the Uchtspringe branch board members, which were branded as “politically unreliable”. Through the investigation of diverse historical sources includ-ing ego documents this article focuses on the self-perception and perception others had of the unionised nurses, in the context of changing management and political systems and the impact of gender issues. Be-yond that I investigate the input the VGS headquarters had to a new concept of nursing ethics which provid-ed an alternative to the ethical basis of denominational and secularised sisterhoods.
%L 940
%K Nursing Ethics
%K Nursing History
%K Professionalisation
%K Psychiatric Nursing
%K Trade Union
%K Weimar Republic
%R 10.25974/enhe2020-6en
%U http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-33-50676
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.25974/enhe2020-6en

Download

Bibtex

@Article{urbach2020,
  author = 	"Urbach, Anna",
  title = 	"How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the ``Insane''? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900--1933",
  journal = 	"European Journal for Nursing History and Ethics",
  year = 	"2020",
  volume = 	"2",
  number = 	"1",
  keywords = 	"Nursing Ethics; Nursing History; Professionalisation; Psychiatric Nursing; Trade Union; Weimar Republic",
  abstract = 	"This article sheds light on nurses' early ventures into union work, it analyses the conditions, circumstances and boundaries the unionisation of psychiatric nurses entailed during the German Reich in the early 20th century. I use the staff files of selected nurses and orderlies from the former Uchtspringe Prussian State Asy-lum to reconstruct case histories of unionised nursing staff. We can say that until the ban on organising was lifted in 1918, the nurses of the ``insane'' were strictly forbidden to act independently of the institution's man-agement within a trade union. Nonetheless, there is evidence that a number of nurses and orderlies of Uchtspringe were members of the German Association of Nurses and Orderlies (Deutscher Verband der Krankenpfleger und Krankenpflegerinnen) even before the beginning of the First World War. In 1919, a branch of the Association of Municipal and State Workers (Verband der Gemeinde- und Staatsarbeiter, VGS), which had close ties to the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), was founded at Uchtspringe, and dur-ing the Weimar period it became the main union representative of Uchtspringe's committed staff. When the National Socialists seized power, they abruptly ended the activity of the Uchtspringe branch board members, which were branded as ``politically unreliable''. Through the investigation of diverse historical sources includ-ing ego documents this article focuses on the self-perception and perception others had of the unionised nurses, in the context of changing management and political systems and the impact of gender issues. Be-yond that I investigate the input the VGS headquarters had to a new concept of nursing ethics which provid-ed an alternative to the ethical basis of denominational and secularised sisterhoods.",
  doi = 	"10.25974/enhe2020-6en",
  url = 	"http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-33-50676"
}

Download

RIS

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Urbach, Anna
PY  - 2020
DA  - 2020//
TI  - How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the “Insane”? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900–1933
JO  - European Journal for Nursing History and Ethics
VL  - 2
IS  - 1
KW  - Nursing Ethics
KW  - Nursing History
KW  - Professionalisation
KW  - Psychiatric Nursing
KW  - Trade Union
KW  - Weimar Republic
AB  - This article sheds light on nurses’ early ventures into union work, it analyses the conditions, circumstances and boundaries the unionisation of psychiatric nurses entailed during the German Reich in the early 20th century. I use the staff files of selected nurses and orderlies from the former Uchtspringe Prussian State Asy-lum to reconstruct case histories of unionised nursing staff. We can say that until the ban on organising was lifted in 1918, the nurses of the “insane” were strictly forbidden to act independently of the institution’s man-agement within a trade union. Nonetheless, there is evidence that a number of nurses and orderlies of Uchtspringe were members of the German Association of Nurses and Orderlies (Deutscher Verband der Krankenpfleger und Krankenpflegerinnen) even before the beginning of the First World War. In 1919, a branch of the Association of Municipal and State Workers (Verband der Gemeinde- und Staatsarbeiter, VGS), which had close ties to the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), was founded at Uchtspringe, and dur-ing the Weimar period it became the main union representative of Uchtspringe’s committed staff. When the National Socialists seized power, they abruptly ended the activity of the Uchtspringe branch board members, which were branded as “politically unreliable”. Through the investigation of diverse historical sources includ-ing ego documents this article focuses on the self-perception and perception others had of the unionised nurses, in the context of changing management and political systems and the impact of gender issues. Be-yond that I investigate the input the VGS headquarters had to a new concept of nursing ethics which provid-ed an alternative to the ethical basis of denominational and secularised sisterhoods.
UR  - http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-33-50676
DO  - 10.25974/enhe2020-6en
ID  - urbach2020
ER  - 
Download

Wordbib

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<b:Sources SelectedStyle="" xmlns:b="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography"  xmlns="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/bibliography" >
<b:Source>
<b:Tag>urbach2020</b:Tag>
<b:SourceType>ArticleInAPeriodical</b:SourceType>
<b:Year>2020</b:Year>
<b:PeriodicalTitle>European Journal for Nursing History and Ethics</b:PeriodicalTitle>
<b:Volume>2</b:Volume>
<b:Issue>1</b:Issue>
<b:Url>http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-33-50676</b:Url>
<b:Url>http://dx.doi.org/10.25974/enhe2020-6en</b:Url>
<b:Author>
<b:Author><b:NameList>
<b:Person><b:Last>Urbach</b:Last><b:First>Anna</b:First></b:Person>
</b:NameList></b:Author>
</b:Author>
<b:Title>How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the “Insane”? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900–1933</b:Title>
<b:Comments>This article sheds light on nurses’ early ventures into union work, it analyses the conditions, circumstances and boundaries the unionisation of psychiatric nurses entailed during the German Reich in the early 20th century. I use the staff files of selected nurses and orderlies from the former Uchtspringe Prussian State Asy-lum to reconstruct case histories of unionised nursing staff. We can say that until the ban on organising was lifted in 1918, the nurses of the “insane” were strictly forbidden to act independently of the institution’s man-agement within a trade union. Nonetheless, there is evidence that a number of nurses and orderlies of Uchtspringe were members of the German Association of Nurses and Orderlies (Deutscher Verband der Krankenpfleger und Krankenpflegerinnen) even before the beginning of the First World War. In 1919, a branch of the Association of Municipal and State Workers (Verband der Gemeinde- und Staatsarbeiter, VGS), which had close ties to the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), was founded at Uchtspringe, and dur-ing the Weimar period it became the main union representative of Uchtspringe’s committed staff. When the National Socialists seized power, they abruptly ended the activity of the Uchtspringe branch board members, which were branded as “politically unreliable”. Through the investigation of diverse historical sources includ-ing ego documents this article focuses on the self-perception and perception others had of the unionised nurses, in the context of changing management and political systems and the impact of gender issues. Be-yond that I investigate the input the VGS headquarters had to a new concept of nursing ethics which provid-ed an alternative to the ethical basis of denominational and secularised sisterhoods.</b:Comments>
</b:Source>
</b:Sources>
Download

ISI

PT Journal
AU Urbach, A
TI How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the “Insane”? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900–1933
SO European Journal for Nursing History and Ethics
PY 2020
VL 2
IS 1
DI 10.25974/enhe2020-6en
DE Nursing Ethics; Nursing History; Professionalisation; Psychiatric Nursing; Trade Union; Weimar Republic
AB This article sheds light on nurses’ early ventures into union work, it analyses the conditions, circumstances and boundaries the unionisation of psychiatric nurses entailed during the German Reich in the early 20th century. I use the staff files of selected nurses and orderlies from the former Uchtspringe Prussian State Asy-lum to reconstruct case histories of unionised nursing staff. We can say that until the ban on organising was lifted in 1918, the nurses of the “insane” were strictly forbidden to act independently of the institution’s man-agement within a trade union. Nonetheless, there is evidence that a number of nurses and orderlies of Uchtspringe were members of the German Association of Nurses and Orderlies (Deutscher Verband der Krankenpfleger und Krankenpflegerinnen) even before the beginning of the First World War. In 1919, a branch of the Association of Municipal and State Workers (Verband der Gemeinde- und Staatsarbeiter, VGS), which had close ties to the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), was founded at Uchtspringe, and dur-ing the Weimar period it became the main union representative of Uchtspringe’s committed staff. When the National Socialists seized power, they abruptly ended the activity of the Uchtspringe branch board members, which were branded as “politically unreliable”. Through the investigation of diverse historical sources includ-ing ego documents this article focuses on the self-perception and perception others had of the unionised nurses, in the context of changing management and political systems and the impact of gender issues. Be-yond that I investigate the input the VGS headquarters had to a new concept of nursing ethics which provid-ed an alternative to the ethical basis of denominational and secularised sisterhoods.
ER

Download

Mods

<mods>
  <titleInfo>
    <title>How Much Politics is Permissible in the Nursing of the “Insane”? The History of the Unionisation of Psychiatric Nurses in the German Reich through the Lens of the Uchtspringe Prussian State Asylum 1900–1933</title>
  </titleInfo>
  <name type="personal">
    <namePart type="family">Urbach</namePart>
    <namePart type="given">Anna</namePart>
  </name>
  <abstract>This article sheds light on nurses’ early ventures into union work, it analyses the conditions, circumstances and boundaries the unionisation of psychiatric nurses entailed during the German Reich in the early 20th century. I use the staff files of selected nurses and orderlies from the former Uchtspringe Prussian State Asy-lum to reconstruct case histories of unionised nursing staff. We can say that until the ban on organising was lifted in 1918, the nurses of the “insane” were strictly forbidden to act independently of the institution’s man-agement within a trade union. Nonetheless, there is evidence that a number of nurses and orderlies of Uchtspringe were members of the German Association of Nurses and Orderlies (Deutscher Verband der Krankenpfleger und Krankenpflegerinnen) even before the beginning of the First World War. In 1919, a branch of the Association of Municipal and State Workers (Verband der Gemeinde- und Staatsarbeiter, VGS), which had close ties to the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), was founded at Uchtspringe, and dur-ing the Weimar period it became the main union representative of Uchtspringe’s committed staff. When the National Socialists seized power, they abruptly ended the activity of the Uchtspringe branch board members, which were branded as “politically unreliable”. Through the investigation of diverse historical sources includ-ing ego documents this article focuses on the self-perception and perception others had of the unionised nurses, in the context of changing management and political systems and the impact of gender issues. Be-yond that I investigate the input the VGS headquarters had to a new concept of nursing ethics which provid-ed an alternative to the ethical basis of denominational and secularised sisterhoods.</abstract>
  <subject>
    <topic>Nursing Ethics</topic>
    <topic>Nursing History</topic>
    <topic>Professionalisation</topic>
    <topic>Psychiatric Nursing</topic>
    <topic>Trade Union</topic>
    <topic>Weimar Republic</topic>
  </subject>
  <classification authority="ddc">940</classification>
  <relatedItem type="host">
    <genre authority="marcgt">periodical</genre>
    <genre>academic journal</genre>
    <titleInfo>
      <title>European Journal for Nursing History and Ethics</title>
    </titleInfo>
    <part>
      <detail type="volume">
        <number>2</number>
      </detail>
      <detail type="issue">
        <number>1</number>
      </detail>
      <date>2020</date>
    </part>
  </relatedItem>
  <identifier type="urn">urn:nbn:de:0009-33-50676</identifier>
  <identifier type="doi">10.25974/enhe2020-6en</identifier>
  <identifier type="uri">http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-33-50676</identifier>
  <identifier type="citekey">urbach2020</identifier>
</mods>
Download

Full Metadata